16

D.W. explains what to ask. Here are some pointer towards how. Wait, first the when: First, talk to people, namely fellow students, TAs and teachers (in that order). Many problems go away after you talk to somebody who is thinking about the same problem, or has done so before. If that is no option (really?) or does not work out: Google your problem. ...


15

TL,DR: me too. Posting a scan of the text in a textbook or worksheet is a low in laziness. (I'd say a new low but I've seen that before on SE.) That right there can justify a downvote. A scan of a figure can be ok, as long as it has accompanying text that explains the problem. For example, this is an appropriate question: the text in book reference says ...


11

The tooltip on a downvote button reads This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful If your opinion of a question is “this guy should do his own homework instead of dumping it on us”, that's a prime case of “does not show any research effort”, and a downvote is perfectly consistent with the guidelines. As per our homework ...


10

Ask questions about concepts, not about your exercise Don't ask us about how to solve your homework exercise. Instead, spend some time trying to solve the homework exercise, and use that to figure out where you have a conceptual gap in your understanding. Then, ask about the concept you don't quite understand yet. If you've done a good job of this, often ...


8

NO We close questions because they cannot or should not be answered: Duplicate: we don't want to answer the question because it's already been asked and answers before. Off-topic: we don't want to answer because the question is outside our area of expertise, so answers cannot be trusted. Unclear: we can't answer because the it isn't clear what the question ...


7

There are two different questions hidden in your question. In general, are questions about theoretical networking on-topic here? Sure. If it meets with our quality guidelines and site policies, it is suitable here. Networking is definitely part of the scope of computer science. As our help page on what is on-topic says, "This site covers theoretical ...


6

You've had an answer which you found helpful, according to this comment. It wasn't the kind of answer you expected, and the question isn't what you'd meant to ask. Nonetheless, the question and answer now constitute a Q/A pair about computer science. There's no reason for you to delete your question (and since it has an upvoted answer, you can't, anyway). ...


5

It's up to you, but I don't think you need to delete the previous question. As you say, it is a bit vague, but I don't think it's harmful or terrible. One alternative to deleting the old question is to look at whether there are any ways of improving it; that would be a win-win for you and for the site. One thing you could do that might improve the ...


5

I agree with you. It's bad practice to make a large change to the question that changes its meaning, particularly when the question has already received an answer and the change invalidates the existing answer. (I consider this to be true regardless of whether it is the original author making the edit or someone else.) In this case I am sympathetic to the ...


5

Yes, I think this question would be closed as too broad. Generally speaking, if a good answer to “what is X” is “read the Wikipedia article whose title is X”, there's no point in duplicating Wikipedia's content on Stack Exchange. See Is it okay to ask questions here when Wikipedia already has the answer?


4

Yes. I recommend that you downvote those questions. There are several reasons why a downvote is appropriate: They do not show research effort. Also, they are not useful: they are not useful to others, and they do not serve the mission of this site, which is to build an archive of high-quality questions and answers that will be useful to others. They ...


4

But for anything other than algorithms we do relatively poorly. Yes, this is the usual fate of book lists on Stack Exchange. The medium is not conducive to this kind of content. Can we create a reference question for book recommendations? I don't follow: having established that they don't work, let's go and do it? You speak of making an exception — but ...


2

There are several closing reasons: In this case, "needs details" would be an appropriate choice, IMHO. Note that closing does not necessarily imply "poor quality": an offtopic question can be a great one, or there can be multiple good questions (closed as "needs more focus"). That said, if you don't think a closing reason ...


2

A word of warning If what you are working on has been assigned to you for homework, asking about it on the internet may defeat the purpose of the exercise. If your teachers know what they are doing¹, assigned exercises will encourage you to review the requisite material, work with the definitions and theorems², connect different concepts, (occasionally) ...


2

I apologize: I deleted your answer because it didn't answer the question as it then was, but I hadn't realized that the question had been edited beyond recognition and your answer was perfectly legitimate for the question as it was at the time. It is definitely bad practice to edit a question in such a way that existing answers are invalidated. The only ...


2

You haven't stated the question about the trend. The question about trend is not a good question. Topics get popular and then get less popular. It is common. It is not a computer science question but about more about sociology. The real question that I think you have is if the field is bogus or not. That is not good question either. From time to time fields ...


2

I don't follow the premise of the question. Google Trend is probably poor at detecting trends within the scientific community. Professors tend to have strong opinions that may or may not be universally correct. In conclusion, I don't think you have a "real" problem at your hands; and even if you did, you'd be unlikely to get a factual, objective answer. ...


1

EDIT THE QUESTION Most visitors find threads on Stack Exchange after searching on Google. Google gets us about 85% to 90% of our traffic. Other search engines, and searches inside Stack Exchange, only account for a small minority of the traffic. So if you want a question to be found, make sure that Google finds it. I don't know how much attention Google ...


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