16

Generally speaking, personal style should be left alone as long as it doesn't hurt the legibility of posts. If you prefer to use British spelling, we won't edit your post to remove the “u” from your posts on the four-colour problem. On the other hand, if your religion forbids the use of the Shift key, we will edit your posts to capitalize the first letter of ...


10

I give a general introduction on what I consider good editing practice here. With respect to LaTeX, specifically, I have some thoughts. In titles: the less, the better. Not only do LaTeX-heavy titles slow down loading of question lists, they are -- when more complex -- also all but impossible to decipher in RSS feed readers and in the mobile SE app. A ...


10

I don't think there's an official policy, but I agree with Raphael's answer that Mathjax should 'rather not' be used in titles, mostly for the reason that titles are (automatically) used in a lot of places that don't interpret Mathjax. Specifically, my advice would be to: If a title contains 'plaintext formulas', such as Is O(n^2/2) <= O(n^2)?, do not ...


9

For those who can't see it, that question previously contained things like \hspace{-0.02in}. Juho edited the question to remove those manual formatting idiosyncracies. Yes, go ahead and remove those LaTeX commands that manually tweak the spacing in this way. I think your edit was a good one that improves the question, and I think it was fair game. Go ...


5

You can do the formatting using a table for alignment of the labels, manual spacing for indentation and manual typesetting of each word (paying attention to spacing). $$ \begin{array}{ll} & \mathit{stringlen} \leftarrow \text{length of } \mathit{string}. \\ & \mathit{i} \leftarrow \mathit{patlen}. \\ \mathit{top}: & \text{if } \mathit{i} \gt \...


4

*stuff* is for italic formatting. To insert an actual *, type a backslash before the star: \* But I suspect that you're looking for math formatting: $T^T^$ typed $T^*T^*$. For more information, look at the bar with formatting buttons above the edit box, and follow the link to the help center.


4

I have come to rely quite heavily on TikZ, a powerful graphical library for LaTeX. I write code like %p% \usetikzlibrary{positioning} \begin{tikzpicture}[auto] \node[draw, circle] (s) at (00,15) {$s$}; \node[draw, circle] (a) at (15,15) {$a$}; \node[draw, circle] (b) at (15,00) {$b$}; \node[draw, circle] (t) at (00,00) {$t$}; \path[->] (s) ...


4

It's certainly possible, using the standard LaTeX environments: $\begin{pmatrix} 1 & 2 & 3 \\ 4 & 5 & 6 \\ 7 & 8 & 9 \end{pmatrix}$ yields: See here for details and variants.


3

I use \dfrac (or \cfrac). (Example.) And yes, it's painful. Please don't post images of math. They're completly inaccessible to blind people, they can't be searched (not that math search works well on the web today, but it's more likely to improve than image content search), they can't be edited.


3

I write them in a plain text file (in my case with gedit or Geany) and translate with pandoc: pandoc --mathjax -s -o post.html post.md That gives you a pretty good idea of what to expect on SE, provided you don't use Markdown features one of pandoc and SE does not support. I should maybe note that I keep a record of the images I create (in files) since ...


2

I used to use notepages (demo, project). It was slightly annoying, because they use different open/close symbols for mathjax. Then I started using stackedit (project), which works great, and integrates well with Google Docs/Drive and Dropbox. You can even install it as an App under google docs, which will create a stackedit document that will automatically ...


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